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Tag: shingles

 

A roof protects your home. It is also built to protect you and your family from outside elements, such as wind, rain, and hail. However, some homeowners do not pay attention to their home’s roofs. Paying close attention to your roof will help you spot and prevent roof damage that might lead to expensive repairs in the future. Fortunately, it is easy to spot if roof damage needs attention.

Here is how to spot if roof damage needs attention:

Sagging and Water Stains

If your roof is leaking, some sections of your ceiling become discolored and start dipping. You will also see water stains on the walls. To prevent water damage, locate the source of the leak, and fix the leak. Additionally, signs of sagging mean the deck joist is losing its strength. If you notice sagging and water stains, your roof needs attention.

Granules in Eaves Trough

Some people ignore granules in eaves trough because it seems very normal and common. However, this is a serious concern, especially if you see granules of asphalt flow down with water. However, this only happens if you have asphalt shingles roof. As shingles age, they shed their granules, compromising the roof’s protection.

Missing or Damaged Shingles

Some people have installed asphalt shingled roofs. Many people install this type of roofing material because it is cheap, matches any home style, and comes in a variety of colors. Unfortunately, strong wind and hailstorms can blow off or damage asphalt shingles. If you notice missing or damaged shingles, you need urgent roof repair.

Algae Growth

Exposing moisture to the sun leads to algae growth. To stop algae growth, make sure your roof drains extra water off the roof. If your roof retains moisture, you will see a small pond on the roof. This can lead to water leaks. A leaking roof causes moisture to build up around the areas, where the water stands. This gives algae enough nutrients to grow.

Leaking Roof

Damage shingles, clogged eaves trough, and missing nails and fasteners are some of the things that can cause leaks on the roof. However, some people ignore small leaks in their roofs. Do not ignore them because they can lead to big problems. If your roof is leaking, it might mean you have waited for a long time to fix the problem.

Clogged Drains

Water should flow freely on the roof. However, dirt built up, tree pollen, and leaves can clog the drains. Clogged drains can cause major damages to the roof, especially during strong winds, heavy rain, and snow. Regular roof maintenance will help you remove the debris that clogs your drains, which helps prevent roof damage.

Mildew and Mildew

Mold and mildew are two big threats to any home. Mold is especially dangerous to the health of the people living in your home. As the mold spreads, it weakens the roof from the inside of your home. This slowly damages your roof because mold prospers in these conditions.

You now know how to spot if roof damage needs attention. Do not repair your roof if you do not have the necessary skills, experience, and tools. Hire a good roofing contractor to inspect your roof and do the necessary roof repairs.

 

 

As with everything else, the cost of roofing materials and labor keep going up. Planning allows you to create a reliable budget for these big-ticket items. Whether you are interested in the latest technological advances or want to keep your old roofing style and materials, accurate pricing is imperative.

Your local roofing specialists can provide you with additional information about the structure of your home and any special considerations you may have. Skylights, solar paneling, custom chimneys or other building characteristics greatly affect the cost of the project. In addition, the rates are higher if there are multiple layers of roofing material to dispose of and replace.

The most common styles of roofing projects use metal, rubber and asphalt or shingle roofing. The prices of these materials have a tendency to increase in more populated areas. The market and regional popularity also have an influence on the final expense. When obtaining an estimate for your roof, include the following materials and services in your plan to help create a more accurate financial plan:

Metal Roofing
Metal roofs are popular right now. They save on removal fees because they can go on over most existing roof structures. These roofs come in colors that will compliment homes, barns and businesses. Most metal roofs have a 50-year life span. Weather, quality and technical skill play an important part of the actual condition and durability of the life of your new roof. Estimates vary by region and may be higher in some areas.

Northeast: $8.30 to $11.04 per sq ft
$1604 to $2138.70 for 200 sq ft
West Coast: $8.89 to $12.30 per sq ft
$1779 to $2450.00 for 200 sq ft

Rubber Roofs
Rubber roofs are very durable and require limited maintenance. These roofs are generally flat and contain membranes that help draw the water into channels and then into dispersal systems to protect the building and foundation. These roofs use a single sheeting of rubber cut to fit the size of the building. This eliminates seams and reduces maintenance. These roofs usually last about 20 years but most manufacturers only guarantee them for 10 years. Prices for these roofs may increase by as much as 14% due to the complexity of the roofing job.

Northeast: $2.15 to $3.32 sq ft
$373.89 – $738.51 for 200 sq ft roof
Midwest: $2.14 to $3.25 per sq ft
$2148 to $2781 for 200 sq ft roof

Asphalt Roofs
Traditional shingle roofs are found on many different styles of houses, buildings and structures throughout the United States. They are popular because you can easily install a new roof over the top of an existing roof. This helps keep the price down and reduces your landfill waste. The prices will increase about 12% to 15% if you have hired a general contractor to oversee the project.

Northeast: $5.63 to $7.30 per sq ft
$1129 to $1467 for 200 sq ft roof
Midwest: $5.59 to $7.26 per sq ft
$1118 to $1453 for $200 sq ft roof

If these options do not meet your needs, there are other roofing options to consider. Remember, whatever style you choose, there are many things to consider when totaling the price of your roof. Labor and materials are only part of the total cost. Discuss your needs extensively with your contractor. There may be structural considerations, timing issues and disposal concerns once the project is underway. Addressing these subjects early on keep them from becoming a major problem later.

Information Provided by The Roofing Directory

Repairing your roof is a smart way to correct a problem before it gets out of hand, causing even more damage and expense. If caught early enough, there are quite a number of roof-damage issues that are fairly simple and cost-efficient to fix. Houselogic.com urges homeowners to be on the lookout for signs of roof damage and recommends a roof inspection once a year.

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When conducting this inspection on the inside of your home, you should ensure that the ceiling contains no dark spots, that the paint job is intact underneath roof overhangs, and that there is no dampness or water staining on pipes or fireplaces. If discovered, these problems can be corrected with reasonable expense. Since these figures are estimates and vary from location to location, housewyse.com recommends that homeowners obtain bids from several contractors in order to receive the very best value for their money.

Elizabeth Dunn, contributor at AngiesList.com, provides a list of specifics that helps to determine the cost of a roof repair job. Roof type, for instance, can prove a huge factor due to the roofing material, topography, and pitch. Asphalt is relatively inexpensive, whereas white sheet and tile shingles can cost up to 1,000 per square foot, so this price discrepancy will impact your overall repair cost. Dunn also addresses other factors, such as size of the job, water damage, and the adherence to state permits, all of which can greatly impact total repair costs. For example, if your state requires a specific procedure for conducting a roof repair, extra materials may be needed to ensure that the roof meets the standards outlined in the permit. Also, if you have extra navigational obstacles, such as a chimney or a skylight, the contractor may charge additional fees.

Indoor / Outdoor Roof-Related Issues and Costs:

Cost of Water Damage Repairs: Through the use of a clever calculating system, Housewyse.com reports some helpful costs of repair statistics and what actions are required to complete the repair. Again, since there are no set-in-stone prices for such repairs, we will “plug in” the state of Indiana to gather some statistics for the average cost. There is a direct labor expense, or the price of the actual work being performed, and this repair takes approximately three hours and around $220 to complete. The supply cost of items such as fasteners, seam tape, and top compound, will average around $25 per patch, setting the estimated cost of repair at $250.

Roof Gutter Repairs: According to Mike Long, roofing expert and contributor at AngiesList.com, homeowners should take a look at the condition of their gutters to ensure that there is no bending, leaking, overflowing, or rusting. If a problem is determined, Long reports that the repair cost averages approximately $200-$1,000 for a 2,000 square-foot home.

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Houselogic.com outlines some issues to look for when inspecting the exterior of the roof, such as bucking shingles and moss or lichen growth. The roofing blog at roofing-directory.com reports that homeowners should expect to pay around $1,500 for shingle repair since shingles are sold by the square, and each square runs between $100 to $300.

A roof shampoo is recommended for moss or lichen growth in order to prevent decay to your roof due to the decomposing action of these fungi. Brian Eckert with CostOwl.com reports that the cost of roof cleaning varies with service professional and location. For a 1,200 square-foot home, you will likely pay around $250-$500 for this service. The roof of a 2,500 square-foot home would probably cost between $375-$750 to clean. Keep in mind that variables such as height and roof size will certainly impact the overall cost.

As houselogic.com explains, a roof that is in good condition is definitely worth the time and money to repair, and you should also explore other options when considering the cost and scope of a roof-repair project. Many repairs are quick solutions that the homeowners can even fix themselves. Others are not so simple, but if the cause is weather-related, it’s a good idea to check with your insurance company to determine if such damage is covered under policy.

Finally, if a personal roof inspection leaves you with questions, you might consider gathering a professional inspection of your roof to ensure that all issues are adequately addressed. Houselogic.com explains that homeowners can either receive a free inspection through a participating company or can secure a professional roof inspector for around $175 through the National Roof Certification and Inspection Association. Keep in mind, however, that the key to successful roof repair is to adequately prevent and address issues as soon as possible to prevent further damage. In this way, you can work to extend the life of your roof, saving yourself much aggravation and expense.

Sources: http://www.angieslist.com/articles/5-factors-influence-price-roof-repair.htm
http://www.angieslist.com/articles/gutter-trouble-when-replace-instead-repair.htm
http://www.costowl.com/home-improvement/roof-cleaning-cost.html

Average Cost of a Shingle Repair Job

Roofing: Repair or Replace?


http://www.homewyse.com/services/cost_to_repair_ceiling_water_damage.html

A strong roof on a home is one of the most critical elements of keeping the structure in good condition, and when problems occur, it’s vital to obtain the assistance of a professional roofer before any further damage to the home can happen. Home owners can go for years without fixing things like a broken cabinet or a faulty door inside their home, but a roof is far too essential to leave unattended.

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Different roofing jobs will have various timelines associated with them as far as how long the overall project might take. There are many circumstances that might impact the average time required to complete a roof replacement project.

Narrowing down the completion timeframe for a roof replacement will usually encompass a few different projects related to the overall project length and the actual time that the roofing company might spend on the roof making changes. A roof can actually be installed in many cases in just a few days on an average sized home that is not too architecturally complex, yet the overall process might take as long as a few months from start to finish.

From the time at which a problem is found until the roof is finally finished, a lot of things need to happen. Those projects include:

1. Inspection by the roofer and/or insurance company
2. Estimate of timeframe and cost from roofing company
3. Approval and funding from home insurance company
4. Acquisition of materials and scheduling
5. Roof repair and/or installation
6. Final paperwork for the insurance company

As long as there are no serious problems during the process, complete repair and replacement of a roof on a standard home would require a project length of a few months. The actual work on the house would be much shorter, however, and could be less than a week.

Additional elements that could lengthen the average time of completion could include:

1. The time of year

Roofing jobs should be scheduled during patterns of good weather although some roofing emergencies might require that a crew does some work during the rainy season or when it’s highly likely to snow.

It is possible to complete a roof replacement job in the dead of winter when there’s snow all over the ground, but the time table for the project is usually a few weeks longer than if it is accomplished in the summer.

2. Materials acquired for the new roof

Common materials for a new or replacement roof may include slate, composite or metal shingles, and the decision to utilize one of these roofing types will usually depend on how much a home owner wants to spend and how long they want the new roof to last. Other popular roofing materials may include clay, plastic, classic wood or simple asphalt.

Roofing materials like an asphalt roll might be installed quickly, but they will only last about a decade before needing replacement. Slate or Spanish tiles, on the other hand, may last over a century but will require longer installation time.

It’s also essential to consider that sometimes a roofing material is out of stock and may be back ordered. This could push back or extend the timeline of the project by a few weeks.

3. Size and complexity of the home or project area

It’s not a surprise to find out that a large home that has five thousand square feet inside it would probably have a much longer timeframe for roof replacement than a home that was just a thousand square feet.

As far as the shape of the house is concerned, sometimes the roof of a home will have nothing more than a single peak rising to the center without any depressed areas where the roof rises and falls. These types of roofs will usually offer the shortest timeline for completion. More complex architectural designs for the roof may require additional materials used to maintain the structural integrity of the building materials and work around impediments like chimneys.

4. Hidden problems and damage

It’s often possible to diagnose a problem in a roof by having it inspected by a roofing professional, but sometimes there is damage that isn’t immediately obvious or which doesn’t become apparent until the repair process has begun. In such circumstances, days or even weeks may be added to the project time frame.

Sometimes when a home owner has decided to have their roof replaced due to general aging and has not had to deal with an emergency, issues of wear and tear could enter into the project. Replacement of certain interior elements of the home could become necessary and would require additional construction personnel and time be added to the timeframe.

Before replacing a roof, it pays to do plenty of research. Like most people, you probably want a roof that will last for decades. It’s also nice to have one that requires little to no maintenance. Several materials are popularly used on roofs in the United States. Some of them are a lot more durable than others. Exceptionally durable materials tend to be more expensive, but cost is not always a reflection of quality because some materials work better under certain circumstances than others. What works for a home in a hot, dry climate may not work for a home in a cold, wet one.

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Factors that Affect the Longevity of a Roof
The material out of which a roof is made has the biggest impact on its longevity. However, other factors come into play as well. Exposure to the sun plays a strong role, and the slope of the roof has a major effect as well. The type of maintenance that a roof receives affects its longevity too. Even when a roof is made out of virtually maintenance-free materials, occasional work is necessary to ensure that it lasts as long as possible.

Popular Roofing Materials and Their Average Lifespans
You shouldn’t base your decision solely on the lifespan of a given roofing material, but this information can help you make the most informed selection possible.

  • Asphalt Shingles – Without a doubt, asphalt shingles are the most popular roofing materials in the United States. On average, this roofing material lasts anywhere from 15 to 30 years. The reason for the wide range involves climate. In colder climates, asphalt shingles may last 25 years or longer; in warmer, more humid climate, they may only last 12 to 14 years. These shingles have petroleum bases that dry out over time, so they definitely don’t last forever.
  • Composite – Composite shingles, or composition shingles, are popular for a variety of reasons. Some of them are primarily made out of asphalt, but there are fiberglass-based options as well. Many composite shingles also include recycled materials, so they can be eco-friendly options. While they require very little maintenance and are quite adaptable, they don’t have great lifespans. On average, you can expect a roof made out of composite shingles to last about 20 years. If you live in an area that regularly experiences high winds, composite shingles are not a good option.
  • Metal – Metal roofs have experienced a surge in popularity in recent years. In addition to having extremely long lifespans, these roofs dramatically enhance the energy efficiency of homes. Standing-seam metal roofs, which are the most popular, can last 75 to 100 years. Metal roofs are resistant to fire, insects and rot. Very little maintenance is needed, but it should still be performed. Metal roofs should be inspected periodically, and they should be scraped and repainted with rust-resistant paint when needed. As long as this basic maintenance is performed, a roof like this should serve you well for a long time to come.
  • Tile – Most people are drawn to tile roofs for their beauty. Tile is most commonly used on homes that have Spanish or Italian architecture. In addition to looking great, tile roofs can last a really long time. Some have lifespans of up to 100 years. Unfortunately, tiles are often installed on mortar bed systems, which makes them susceptible to slippage. In that case, this type of roof may only last about 10 years. Therefore, exceptional installation is critical. Because tiles are often made out of terra cotta and other dense materials, they tend to be heavy. Extra support is often needed. Tiles are also fragile, which presents a problem when performing maintenance on a roof.
  • Slate – For a natural, stunning look, it’s tough to beat slate. Very fine slivers of stone are used to create these roofs, which have lifespans of 45 to 75 years when they are properly maintained. Like tile, slate can be very fragile, and it can require extra support due to its weight. The thickness and density of slate tiles affect their longevity. Slate roofs generally require very little maintenance. However, the main thing that affects their longevity is failure of fasteners and nails. These components should be inspected regularly and replaced promptly at the first sign of weakness.
  • Wood – Estimating the lifespan of a wood roof isn’t easy because so many factors affect its durability. The slope of the roof, the amount of sun exposure it receives and the quality of the maintenance that’s performed all have an impact. Furthermore, the width, thickness and cut of the wood affect its longevity as well. When properly treated, installed and maintained, the average wood roof should last 15 to 30 years. Out of all of the available options, cedar is the best choice.
  • Fiberglass – Homeowners love the versatility and style of fiberglass roofs. This option is sold in panels and sheets, which makes it easy to achieve the perfect look and protection. The fiberglass that’s used is glazed to make it exceptionally waterproof. Fiberglass is also naturally shatterproof, so it’s a strong, durable choice. The best fiberglass roofs are designed to be resistant to rot, mildew and rust. At the high end of the scale, a fiberglass roof should last around 30 years. As with other roofing materials, maintenance and design have major impacts on the lifespan of this type of roof.
  • Concrete – People are often surprised to learn that concrete can be used as a roofing material. A concrete roof doesn’t involve heavy slabs of material. Today’s best options use fiber-reinforced cement to achieve optimal style and durability. When mixed with cellulose, concrete can be crafted to look like wood shakes. Concrete roofs can also be used to replicate tiles and other popular roofing materials. Depending on the design of the roof and its underlying materials, concrete shingles or panels can last up to 50 years. This type of roofing material is virtually maintenance-free, and it’s resistant to rot, insects and fire.
  • Rubber – Although it’s infrequently used, rubber is a viable roofing material in many situations. Most people turn to it for its eco-friendliness, but it has other benefits too. A rubber roof offers exceptional energy efficiency. Shingled rubber roofs are available, but whole-roof designs, which are custom-created at the factory, are much better options. These rubber roofs are seamless, so they are exceptionally leak-proof and can last up to 40 years. Rubber roofs are also flexible and lightweight, and they are available in a variety of colors and designs.

Before considering any roofing materials in earnest, give some thought to the climate where you house is located. Is it usually wet or dry? Is it usually sunny or cloudy? Would you describe it as a warm climate or a cold one? These factors will all help you zero in on the ideal roofing material. From there, weigh the pros and cons of the top options, and remember that cost doesn’t necessarily reflect quality. Regardless of the material that’s used, first-rate installation is vital. To ensure that your roof lasts as long as possible, make sure that it is inspected and serviced regularly.

Shingles cover the roofing substructure to help sloping roofs shed rain, snow, ice and hail while channeling water away so that standing pools of water will not weaken structural integrity or allow water to seep under shingles and leak from ceilings or down interior walls. Replacing an entire roof offers dangerous risks and exhausting work, but homeowners can replace damaged or missing shingles easily. Check roofs for leaks each fall and spring, replacing any shingles that have become cracked, curled-up, broken or missing in action from severe weather or high winds.

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Tools and Materials Needed to Replace Shingles

The right tools help to make roofing repair jobs go smoothly. The first requirement is a sturdy extension ladder, which handy homeowners should never leave unattended while making repairs. A complete list of tools and materials includes the following shingle-laying essentials:

  • Extension ladder
  • Claw hammer
  • Shingle ripper or hacksaw for wood shingles
  • Chisel
  • Pry bar
  • Roofing nails
  • Roofing cement
  • Utility knife
  • Replacement shingles

Shingles come in asphalt, wood, fiberglass, metal and ceramic materials, so determine the type and size of shingles to match roof composition.

Step-by-Step Guide to Shingle Replacement

Replacing one shingle requires loosening the damaged shingle and the shingles on the two rows immediately above it. Use a long knife to cut through cement in the middle of the shingle. The following steps will help homeowners make effective and safe shingle repairs:

  1. In addition to the cement, properly installed shingles have eight nails—four in the middle and four on the top. Use a pry bar to lift the damaged shingle carefully to loosen nails without damaging the surrounding shingles. Remove the nails.
  2. Repeat the process on the next level, and then remove pry up the damaged shingle to remove the top nails.
  3. Remove shingle, and if necessary, use it as a guide to size the replacement, which might need cutting to fit.
  4. Slide the new shingle into place with a coating of cement in the middle and a dab at each corner, which helps to hold it place.
  5. Attach four nails at the top and middle of the shingle to affix it permanently. Hammer nails gently in the replacement and surrounding shingles to stabilize the repair.
  6. Cover the tops of the nails with roofing cement to make the repair watertight. The shingles might need weights overnight to keep them flat.

Roof Shingle Repair Tips

Never risk safety for speed or convenience. If the weather threatens rain, snow, bitter cold or high winds, delay the repair project. Excess heat can also prove problematic if replacing several shingles because roof surfaces heat to extreme temperatures and working on the roof exposes workers to direct sunlight, so take temperatures into consideration and work in the mornings or evenings when it’s hot.

Position the ladder roughly one-fourth of the roof’s height away from the house to create a safe and secure angle for support. The top of the ladder should extend several feet above the roof line. Get someone to watch the ladder when ascending or descending to prevent mishaps. Other tips include the following advice:

  • Make repairs only when roofs are completely dry. Slippery roofs cause falls.
  • Rubber-soled or antislip shoes help to limit risks. Stay aware of any overhead power lines, roofing structures and other navigation obstacles.
  • If unable to find matching shingles, nonmatching shingles will work, especially aluminum or copper.
  • Always use safety ropes and secure ladders with proper anchoring techniques.
  • Using a utility knife to round the back corners of replacement shingles makes it easier to slide them in place.
  • Improper installations and defective flashings around chimneys account for over 90 percent of all roof leaks, so inspect flashings when checking for damaged shingles.
  • Multiple leaks, significant damage or installing ceramic tiles might need the expertise of professional roofers. If repairs fail to control leaking ceilings, then hire a licensed roofer.

When to Replace Roofs

Roofs with severe damage need professional attention because several complications develop. Housing codes allow stacking up to three layers of shingles, but after reaching the limit, homeowners must remove old shingles, which presents the challenges of removing old tiles and disposing of them. Laying an entire roof involves flashing problems, waterproofing, dealing with uneven surfaces, following overlapping patterns to channel water off the roof and getting the necessary building permits.

Homeowners and landlords might want to consider replacing roofs with more than 20-percent damage to protect their property from the devastating effects of leaks. Timely repairs help to limit deterioration and reduce the need for costly repairs and replacements. Following safety guidelines and planning repair jobs could save lots of headaches, and getting a friend to help offers protection from many kinds of emergencies that might occur.

Terracotta or fired clay tile has been used as a roofing material for thousands of years. Tiles were used in the Bronze Age in ancient Greece as early as 2500 B.C., in ancient Middle Eastern civilizations and in China in the Neolithic period approximately 10,000 years ago. Terracotta tile was commonly used as a roofing material by the ancient Greeks and Romans.

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Tiles have been used as roofing on buildings in Europe from Roman times to the present. In some European cities like London, fired clay tiles were required because of their fireproof qualities. Early use of clay roof tiles in the United States has been documented at Jamestown and the settlement of Roanoke Island in 1585. Terracotta tiles were used on Spanish missions throughout Florida and the western states. Terracotta tiles are associated with specific architectural styles like Spanish Mission and Italianate Villa, but complement almost any building style.

Benefits of Terracotta Roof Tiles

Terracotta clay roof tiles are attractive, impermeable and durable. Terracotta is a natural material, made from clay that is fired at a high temperature until it vitrifies or fuses. Vitrification creates a hard, waterproof surface that withstands rain, snow, cycles of freezing and thawing and wears well in coastal areas with salt air. They are fireproof, last up to 100 years or more and are almost maintenance-free. Because they are made from clay, terracotta tiles are easy to recycle and do not harm the environment.

Clay roof tiles are traditionally red, which is a moderately reflective color. Light-colored roofs, also called cool roofs, have higher reflectance and emissivity than dark-colored roofs. More than 90 percent of the roofs in the United States are of dark-colored materials which are low-reflectance and can reach temperatures of 150 to 190 degrees F. Cool roofs stay cooler, sometimes as much as 70 degrees cooler than a dark-colored roof, resulting in lower energy costs and more comfortable building interiors.

With the interest in saving energy and using more environmentally sustainable building techniques, manufacturers have developed fired clay tiles that achieve higher reflectivity and emissivity indices. These tiles, available in many colors including the traditional red-orange terracotta, achieve cool roof values. Several manufacturers produce clay tiles that meet Energy Star specifications.

Clay tiles are made in three grades according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications. Grade 1 tiles withstand severe freeze-thaw conditions and are not porous. They can be used anywhere in the United States. Grade 2 tiles withstand moderate freeze-thaw cycles and are less water-resistant. Grade 3 tiles are more permeable and may flake in freeze-thaw cycles. Grade 3 tiles are recommended for areas with mild climates like Florida and southern California.

ASTM sets values for transverse breaking strength for tiles of different profiles or curvatures. These values correlate with the ability of a tile to withstand stresses including severe weather, hail and handling and installation.

Some manufacturers apply glaze to tiles which adds color and additional surface protection. Glazed tiles are often untreated on the underside which reduces weight, expense in manufacture and allows the tile to breathe and expel moisture from the untreated surface. Many manufacturers provide guarantees against color fading for a specified number of years.

Terracotta tiles are available in several shapes that give a unique look to the roof architecture. There are several interlocking systems that ensure that the tiles protect the roof and remain in place. Each system has a required amount of overlap that connects tiles on either side, above and below to prevent moisture from seeping between the tiles.

Mission clay tiles, also called Barrel tiles and S-curved tiles, have a highly rounded curve which gives the traditional look to Spanish style buildings. Flat clay tiles, also called English Shingle or Closed Shingle, are used on several styles of buildings. Flat pan tiles with curved cover tiles were used on classic Doric order buildings like those in the Acropolis at Athens.

Disadvantages of Terracotta Roof Tiles

Installation of clay tiles requires experienced, trained contractors. Clay tiles are more difficult to install than other types of roof materials and must be properly installed to withstand rain, severe weather and cycles of freezing and thawing. Manufacturers recommend horizontal and vertical overlap values to ensure that water does not penetrate between the tiles. Tiles must be properly anchored to flashings and eaves to protect underlying roof material.

If clay roof tiles leak, the underlying roof structure can be damaged. Leaks can travel beyond the source of the breakage or gap, so when replacing tiles or repairing leaks it is important to examine adjacent areas.

Terracotta tiles are breakable. Once installed, tiles should be walked on with care. If roof access is required, tiles should be removed or boards placed across a span of tiles to distribute weight. The most common reason for breakage is from falling tree limbs.

Clay tile is not recommended for low-pitch roofs. Clay roof tiles can be heavy, so must have good roof and wall support. Some manufacturers offer light-weight clay tiles that weigh less than 600 pounds per square in compliance with many building code requirements for reroofing.

Costs can increase depending on the distance tiles are shipped from the manufacturing source to the consumer.

Since a roof serves to keep out the elements and protect the house below, the choice of roofing materials varies heavily from region to region across North America. In the Pacific Northwest, homeowners need to deal with heavy rainfall and very high humidity levels, so every roof needs to be water-resistant. Choosing the right materials is extremely important because water damage can cost tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars to repair. Conversely, a roof that drains well and resists water damage can stay in place for a long time before needing replacement.

Probably the most common roofing material used in the Pacific Northwest today is asphalt. Custom-designed asphalt shingles can closely imitate the appearance of wood, ceramic, slate or metal shingles at a significantly lower cost, and the material is naturally durable and resistant to water and heat. Still, because asphalt is a porous material, these shingles are somewhat susceptible to mold or algae growth and require a degree of maintenance. Furthermore, many home buyers prefer the natural appearance of wooden shingles, so opting for asphalt can reduce the sale value of the home. Generally speaking, an asphalt roof will last about 20 to 30 years.

Thanks to their widespread availability in the region and relatively low cost, cedar and redwood are two of the most popular roofing materials among Northwestern homeowners. Both of these woods are generally considered to be fairly attractive and, if properly maintained, can last up to 50 years before needing replacement. Furthermore, redwood or cedar shingles tend to add to the value of the house. However, a roof made from cedar or redwood is inherently vulnerable to rot, algae or moss. Water-resistant treatment can reduce these risks, but homeowners who opt for one of these materials should still expect to pay for frequent maintenance. Thus, the benefits of a classic, natural-looking roof must be weighed against the cost and effort required to keep the roof maintained.

Metal shingles, most commonly steel, offer excellent water resistance and typically require less maintenance than other roofing materials, making them ideal for hands-off Northwestern homeowners. Most metal roofing products come in a “standing seam” style that consists of a series of interlocking panels. Like asphalt shingles, metal shingles can be custom-designed to mimic other materials such as cedar, redwood or slate. They tend to be more expensive than asphalt, but can last up to 50 years if properly installed and maintained.

Many recently constructed homes in the Pacific Northwest use roofing tiles made from clay or concrete. Vitrified clay tiles, which are almost glass-like thanks to a special hardening process, are available in a variety of colors and styles. Because they are almost impervious to water damage, clay tiles can last 100 years or more before needing replacement, but they are heavy and quite expensive. Concrete tiles are cheaper than clay, but retain the same weight disadvantage and do not last quite as long. Despite their disadvantages, tile products have become increasingly popular in the rainy Northwest over the last quarter-century.

Clay Roofing Tiles

Regardless of material, every home in the Pacific Northwest needs a roof designed to deal with the heavy rain. As a rule, flat sections of roofing are not desirable because they allow water to pool and cause mold, mildew or other damage. Most homes use V-shaped gable roofing or four-sided hipped roofing to allow water to run off easily.

Whether they opt for asphalt, wood, metal, tile or another roofing material, homeowners in the Pacific Northwest need to be conscious of the weather in their region and the hazard posed by the heavy rainfall. Every roof needs to be designed with water resistance in mind and frequently inspected and cleaned to prevent water damage. Each material comes with advantages and disadvantages in terms of weight, cost, durability and maintenance. By taking all of these factors into account, Northwestern homeowners can select the right roofing materials to meet their homes’ individual needs.

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